ABOUT THE TAX SYMPOSIUM

TAXATION: CHANGING PATHWAYS

“Change is an inevitable part of life”

Thought leadership starts with new and informed ideas being shared and refined with a colloquium of decision makers and open minded people. The Tax Symposium seeks to bring the public sector, private sector and academia together on a global scale in addressing current and future matters of importance in the field of taxation but through informed and researched debate and actionable proposals.

This event has its roots in its sister academic event which started in 2016 and which is jointly hosted by SAICA, the University of New South Wales, the University of Pretoria, UNISA and the University of Johannesburg. This collaboration ensures that that we are developing our local research capabilities through exposing local academics to decision makers and business leaders, both local and international, but also focussing their research efforts on the needs of society and to inform policy changes required.

Historical themes covered include VAT Systems (2016), Tax and Corruption (2017) and Tax Simplicity (2018). The outcomes of these symposia informed discussions and actions on VAT refunds and zero rating practices to approaches in increasing South Africa’s Doing Business ranking through a simplified tax system.

Notable previous attendees and key note speakers include:

  • Inland Revenue

    New Zealand

  • South African Revenue Service

    South Africa

  • National Treasury

    South Africa

  • Ministry of Finance

    Austria

  • Ministry of Finance

    Malaysia

  • Ministry of Finance

    Ghana

  • Office of the Tax Ombud

    South Africa

  • Office of Tax Simplification

    United Kingdom

  • National Taxpayer Advocate

    United States of America

  • African Tax Administration Forum

    Africa Regional

  • SADC Secretariat

    Botswana

  • Public Accountants and Auditors Board

    Zimbabwe

  • World Bank

    Global

  • Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD)

    Global

We are proud that this event has previously drawn participation from all sectors including representatives from these public Institutions:

  • Prof Michael D’Ascenso

    Previous ATO Commissioner, Sydney, Australia

  • Advocate Nina Olsen

    National Taxpayer Advocate, United States of America

  • Professor Judith Freeman

    Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom

  • Prof James Alm

    Tulane University, New Orleans, United States of America

  • Judge Bernard Ngoepe

    Tax Ombud, Pretoria, South Africa

  • Prof John Whiting

    Previous Director of OTS and Non-Executive Director of HMRC, London, United Kingdom

2019 SPEAKERS

more to be announced soon

Professor: Auckland University

Partner: Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP, London

Professor: UNSW Business School

Director: IBFD Knowledge Centre

Founder and CEO: Crystol Energy

Integrated Reporting Project Director: SAICA

Judge Bernard Makgabo Ngoepe

Tax Ombud

BOOKINGS

MEMBER

R1 800
  • 2-day normal seat incl lunch

NON MEMBER

R2 000
  • 2-day normal seat incl lunch

MEMBER

R1 200
  • 2-day discounted seat. no table, no mic

NON MEMBER

R2 000
  • 2-day discounted seat. no table, no mic

MEMBER

R800
  • Webcast, 2 days

NON MEMBER

R1 000
  • Webcast, 2 days

ACADEMICS

R990
  • Academics: 2-day normal seat incl lunch

PREMIUM MEMBER ONLY

R30 000
  • 10 seater private room (only 3 available)

MEMBER

R1 200
  • 2 day rear bulk room seating. No table, no mic

NON MEMBER

R2 000
  • 2 day rear bulk room seating. No table, no mic

WOMEN IN TAX COCKTAIL EVENT

R300
  • -

CHANGING PATHWAYS

50-60 YEARS

  • Modern concept of globalisation of trade

  • Third industrial revolution

40 YEARS

  • Coining of term “globalisation of markets”

  • Television in South Africa

  • Personal computers sold commercially

30 YEARS

  • The Internet is born

  • Cell phones are commercially sold

  • Efiling of tax returns

  • Carbon taxes imposed

  • Online shopping is made available to public

  • Solar power farms created

20 YEARS

  • Human genome decoded

  • Model tax information exchange agreement

  • Selling of Egoods (electronic postal stamps)

  • Youtube (14 years) and Netflix (12 years) streaming services

  • Mainstream GPS usage

  • Wikipedia is created

  • Social media and Google (15 years old)

  • Efiling in South Africa (13 years old)

10 YEARS

  • First all touch screen smartphone

  • Cryptocurrencies

  • Commercially sold drones

  • Commercially sold all electric battery powered cars

  • Uber and AirBnB

  • Social media activism

  • First self-made USD Billionaire under 25 years

5 YEARS

  • 3D metal printing

  • Paris Agreement on climate change

  • Commercially sold self-driving cars

  • Social media taxes first imposed

  • Global billionaires breach 2000 for first time

  • Post industrialisation global mean warming breaches 1 degree centigrade

THEMES

Global competiveness and fiscal sustainability.

Tax policy has become a central instrument in achieving global business competiveness and ensuring fiscal sustainably of economies. The changes have however created a world where global fiscal harmonisation has become endangered and new understandings on what and how tax is shared in the global fiscal system have become the narrative.

Inequality and redistribution

Fiscal policy, especially in Africa, has become a major policy tool to ensure that the inequality of current distribution of economic benefits are addressed. of the economic. Finding the balance in using fiscal revenues to drive economic growth and redistributing wealth and economic benefits is however critical.

Tax Transparency

Many tax systems have always operated within a business continuum of confidentiality and the right of other fiscal jurisdiction to “hide” what they don’t want others to see. However, this paradigm is shifting fast and taxpayers, business and even revenue services rights or obligations to obscure the tax affairs and moral contributions of taxpayers is waning. This change has an immense impact on how tax administration will change and affect all these parties and even their current rights and obligations.

Big data and modernisation

Big data has changed how business and revenue services operate on a global scale. It has meant the need for substantial modernisation of processes and systems. However, the changes have equally had a significant impact on what is expected of taxpayers and also their expectation of revenue services. These expectations extend to protecting data but also ensuring that taxpayers rights are protected and that revenue services adapt to dealing with mass system failures that have become integrated into many aspects of taxpayers lives.

The digital economy

Taxing the digital economy was the first project in addressing the digital economy. However the discussion has now migrated as to whether global taxing rights policy needs to be redetermined and tax administration starts incorporating mechanisms to address the uniqueness of this economic activity. This session will cover a variety of issues related to the main theme.

The changing face of tax disputes

Tax disputes in many jurisdiction are premised on not meeting the letter of the law.

CONTACT

SPONSORSHIP

MattK@saica.co.za

Cell: 071 785 7205